ODP viewpoints



Most complex system specifications are so extensive that no single individual can fully comprehend all aspects of the specifications. Furthermore, we all have different interests in a given system and different reasons for examining the system's specifications. A business executive will ask different questions of a system make-up than would a system implementer. The concept of RM-ODP viewpoints framework, therefore, is to provide separate viewpoints into the specification of a given complex system. These viewpoints each satisfy an audience with interest in a particular set of aspects of the system. Associated with each viewpoint is a viewpoint language that optimizes the vocabulary and presentation for the audience of that viewpoint.

RM-ODP defines five viewpoints. A viewpoint (on a system) is an abstraction that yields a specification of the whole system related to a particular set of concerns. The five viewpoints defined by RM-ODP have been chosen to be both simple and complete, covering all the domains of architectural design. These five viewpoints are:
  • the enterprise viewpoint, which is concerned with the purpose, scope and policies governing the activities of the specified system within the organization of which it is a part;
  • the information viewpoint, which is concerned with the kinds of information handled by the system and constraints on the use and interpretation of that information;
  • the computational viewpoint, which is concerned with the functional decomposition of the system into a set of objects that interact at interfaces - enabling system distribution;
  • the engineering viewpoint, which is concerned with the infrastructure required to support system distribution;
  • the technology viewpoint, which is concerned with the choice of technology to support system distribution.

For each viewpoint there is an associated viewpoint language which can be used to express a specification of the system from that viewpoint. The object modelling concepts give a common basis for the viewpoint languages and make it possible to identify relationships between the different viewpoint specifications and to assert correspondences between the representations of the system in different viewpoints.